Fallacy of your satire

Published June 14th, 2010 by Bobby Henderson

Hello, I have purchased and read your book, The Gospel of the Flying Spaghetti Monster and I would just like to share with you a constructive feedback of your book. For its objective purpose of proving the illogicality of the provincial-minded nature of those who stand in opposition to allowing the scientific theory of the Big Bang/Theory of Evolution from being taught publicly, it served its purpose well. However I would like to call to mind the hypocritical nature of the book. I believe consistency with one’s own message is important to achieve a total victory and it satirically charges Christians with creating blind assumptions. I understand the comparison of pirate decrease to global temperature increase was to further the point of the illogicality of religion, but you assumed there was a lesser amount of pirates. In fact there are more pirates now than there was in the 1700′s, the lack of the Pirates of the Caribbean-esque romanticism is the only reason this fact is not widely spread. You made an assumption which went against fact which defeated your principle of factual basis. One may argue that was the continuation of satire but that would be most likely incorrect as the faux-correlation of coincidence is the satire and not the actual analyzes as global temperature is indeed rising since the last minor ice age in the Napoleonic Era.

Furthermore it appears you attack religion as a whole entity as illogical and we’d be better off it was nonexistent as the end of the book turns into repetitive bashing, This is the same mindset as the illogical fundamentalists whom do not hear the logic of scientific theory who completely disregard science as it is alien to their beliefs. Religion is extremely important in its influence in sociology as it combats the modern mainstream schools of thought such as widespread apathy, post-modernism and rampant sensationalism. It teaches values of selflessness and charity opposing the media advocacy of self-service which even in an evolutionary sense is not nature as we are social animals which rely upon societal advancement, not just the advancement of self. Religion plays a large role in academic studies as well, I’m sure you’re aware that one of the theorists of the Big Bang Theory was a Catholic priest. To the (logically) theistic, the belief in God does not interact with evolution or creation as God is a theory pertaining to spiritual well being while evolution pertains to physical creation. Religion (or belief in God) does not isolate one from logic, rather the fallacy assuming that because one is religious they must abandon reason. I think if you had pulled back on the senseless bashing of theists and made it rather a criticism of the solely illogical due to their ignoring of blatant scientific evidence even the Pope would have agreed with you. Book such as the one of your own writing are dangerous as human beings tend to take the extremity of each end, by the extensive mockery of the religious you isolate them while creating a malicious current in atheists against theists, which is academically wrong as scholarly debate should be through procedure of logic but your book goes from such to foolery. Such anti-God contempt creates social hysteria making people, for example, atheistic in assumption of its logic while in fact they have little intelligence to even contemplate the bane of their existence.This correlates with the thesis of The Prince as one should be firm in their own beliefs and adhered to logic but they can also not crush the other side as that creates blatant opposition for the sake of opposition rather than following a conventional and more satisfying procedure of scholarly victory.

I hope your book has accomplished your objective and enlightens the close-minded Kansas Board of Education.

Maroun Shami

 

This is the type of email I like to receive.  I don’t agree with a lot of what Maroun is saying but I have a lot of respect for him voicing his criticism.  –bobby



226 Responses to “Fallacy of your satire”

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  1. antoine says:

    your rant was verbose and redundant. your use of “big” words was unintimidating and marks you as insecure. perhaps about your own ideology? not sure. but after reading your letter, i presuppose much about what a religious zealot you are in your own right. go spread the word to those as ignorant as yourself.

  2. Tay Perry says:

    Maroun, it appears you need to read more of the good, yummy, word of the FSM. You stated that there are more pirates today than there were in the past, but you must understand that these are not the chosen pirates of the FSM. I shall cite a passage from the gospel; ” Calling oneself a pirate, or dressing up like one, does not make one a true pirate; it takes much more. In what way are modern-day ‘pirates,’ with their speedboats and machine guns, similar to the fun-loving adventurous buccaneers from history?” You see Maroun, modern day pretenders such as those in Somalia are not the chosen people.

  3. Opus T. Penguin says:

    Maroun postulates that religion is beneficial to society as “It teaches values of selflessness and charity…”. This is a common argument; what does it matter that you can’t take our religious teachings literally, just go with it because at least were a positive moral influence. The unspoken assertion here is that a man without religion is a man without a moral compass. This is patently offensive; what morals can you claim if you only do what’s right out of fear that an all-seeing deity will send you to hell? I’d say, those aren’t true morals but rather coercion. I do what’s right without subscribing to any religion because morals are absolute and don’t depend on any outside influence. Indeed, what higher power is needed than a man’s own conscience?

    • TheFewTheProudTheMarinara says:

      Tribes predate religions. It was there cooperation and rules of behaviour were formed. Religion – specifically the wrath of the gods – was used to reinforce rules that already existed. “Even if we don’t see you, the gods do, so toe the line”.

      I completely agree with you, Opus. Several years ago I heard a radio host commenting about music piracy and asking “If you knew you could get away with stealing a CD from the store, why wouldn’t you steal it?”. Well, duh! Because I’m not a thief??

      People mistake the phrase “If it feels good, do it” to be totally hedonistic. To me, it means if it bothers your conscience – if it doesn’t feel good – don’t do it. The hell with it being listed somewhere or having a threat of punishment. If thievery or worse doesn’t bother you, you are a damaged individual, no matter how often – and to whom – you pray.

      • Apprentice Frederic says:

        Pure speculation on my part, but “religion” also seems to have the not-unintended consequence of enhancing the earthly power of a whole panoply of pastors, mullahs, eminences, excellencies, and (with the brilliant exception of one T. Rigatoni) reverends….

        • Keith says:

          But we aren’t supposed to question it! That is what faith is all about: no evidence and no questions.

  4. HoaiPhai says:

    I have to disagree with you on several points, Maroun.

    Georges Lemaître did not make contributions to the field of cosmology due to his religious training, but because of his knowledge of science. His being a priest was incidental to his scientific work.

    The abandonment of reason is the very definition of “faith” (i.e. a belief in spite of a lack of supporting evidence), the foundation of religion. It is this choice of faith over reason that bolsters (some) believers’ rejection of, for example, the overwhelming evidence for evolution because it challenges their belief in The Bible’s rendition of Creation. For these people, to accept evolution is to reject the story of Creation, The Bible, and God Himself. The priests/ministers/etc. of congregations often disparage evolution as “just a theory”, without merit, and as being part of the scientific community’s plan to disprove God.

    The acceptance on faith of the biblical version of the nature of reality whittles away at one’s ability to differentiate between fact and belief, as is demonstrated by various efforts to insert ID into scientific curricula. You seem to imply that this tendency toward delusion is held by only a minority of believers but I cannot recall ever hearing of a cleric rallying his/her congregation to oppose the injection of ID into science classes, can you? Have you ever heard of any mainstream religious body challenging the claims made by the likes of Kent Hovind or Ray “Bananaman” Comfort? Why aren’t there herds of believers stampeding to shut down these guys’ dissemination of lies and misrepresentation of science?

    And just to touch on the sociological influence of religion, The Bible can be quote-mined to either promote ambition, as in Numbers 31:17-18 where Moses ordered the death of every man, woman, and child Midianite (except the 32,000 virgin women, for some divine reason no doubt), or to promote complacency, as in “Blessed are the meek” and in Luke 12:22-23 “…Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat; neither for the body, what ye shall put on. Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat; neither for the body, what ye shall put on. The life is more than meat, and the body is more than raiment.” Doesn’t sound like The Bible is completely against laziness and irresponsibility to me. Religion implicitly preaches an us-against-everyone-else mentality where non-believers and followers of other religions seen as sinners to be avoided.

    One last thing… I don’t think that the FSM book is likely to drive a wedge between believers, Pastafarians, and scientific knowledge. While I have not yet read the book I am under the impression that its purpose is to “preach to the choir”, as it were.

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