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Petroglyph

Published January 1st, 2010 by Bobby Henderson

This photo of a petroglyph on a rock in Arasona shows that the FSM was here earlier than we knew. The boulder is located in White Tanks Regional Park, Phoenix, Az and it has been misidentified as a supernova.
Ramen.
Dotti



19 Responses to “Petroglyph”

  1. StJason says:

    @JDI

    I agree! I mean, how screwed up is a website where random people log in just to make disparaging comments on random threads? THAT IS PURE CRAZY, MAN!

  2. Cassidy says:

    Omg the white tanks are practically in my backyard!!! THE FSM WAS HERE!!!! I feel so blessed with his starchy presence!!! Where is this I must find it!!!!

  3. dorian says:

    50 miles off Lam Began, southern Nevada, there is a state park called Valley of Fire where petroglyphs of the FSM can be seen. check it out: http://www.forsythlv.com/vof2%20050a.jpg
    http://www.forsythlv.com/vof.htm

  4. Randall says:

    I live in Arizona and we have one just like that- I mean exactly!!! More STRONG evidence!

  5. theFewtheProudtheMarinara says:

    Have these rocks been Carbonara-dated?

  6. gordon_uk says:

    To JDI

    Want crazy? read the bilble or talk to the pope! Bonkers!

    G

  7. plumbrbbob says:

    @ 8 – JDI –

    I’ve a feeling that you’re a pretty frightened person. It must be really scary for you to begin to doubt the existence of your invisible sky daddy and his zombie kid.

    Perhaps if you were smart enough to read and follow the directions that were clearly given to you when you entered our site, you would have had your questions answered. After reading the Open Letter and the “About” tab material, you could have learned:

    1) Our mission is the exclusion of religious mythology from the science curricula of public schools.

    2) Our theology is a satire that neither depends on, nor is derivative of any other religion.

    3) We insist that any school board that includes any religious mythology in their science curricula, must also include ours.

    The attached talk by Dr Andy Thomson tells us how our needs as helpless infants uses the same parts of the brain as our thoughts about the mythology of religion:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iMmvu9eMrg

    The fears and terrors of the unknown are powerful drivers in our need for superstition.

    Your delusions are not ours to defend, and you do not have the power to force everyone to stop laughing at you, as much as you’d like to be able to do that. And isn’t that what this is really about? That churches want to be able to punish you for disrespecting their sacred craziness?

    RAmen

  8. plumberbob says:

    @ 8 – JDI -,

    Perhaps if you were smart enough to read and follow the directions that were clearly given to you when you entered our site, you would have had your questions answered. After reading the Open Letter and the “About” tab material, you could have learned:

    1) Our mission is the exclusion of religious mythology from the science curricula of public schools.

    2) Our theology is a satire that neither depends on, nor is derivative of any other religion.

    3) We insist that any school board that includes any religious mythology in their science curricula, must also include ours.

    Your delusions are not ours to defend, and you do not have the power to force everyone to stop laughing at you, as much as you’d like to be able to do that. And isn’t that what this is really about? That churches want to be able to punish you for disrespecting their sacred craziness?

    “There is something feeble and a little contemptible about a man who cannot face the perils of life without the help of comfortable myths. Almost inevitably some part of him is aware that they are myths and that he believes them only because they are comforting. But he dare not face this thought! Moreover, since he is aware, however dimly, that his opinions are not real, he becomes furious when they are disputed.” [Bertrand Russell, "Human Society in Ethics and Politics"]

    RAmen

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